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#17th century
kriskukko · 39 minutes
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dockside -- early spring morning // circa 1630
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history-of-fashion · 2 days
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ab. 1625 Sir Peter Paul Rubens - Portrait of a Lady
(Dulwich Picture Gallery)
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ltwilliammowett · 2 days
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Expensive signals
During the 17th century the giving of salutes by warships became so excessive and wasted so much gunpowder that it placed a real financial burden on the England of Charles II. Ridiculous as it may seem the gunners resorted to their weapons every time every time anyone went ashore, and if it should be a lady the sailors would fire 7 guns and play a tune on the drums. In 1675 a merchant ship in the Thames failed to give an adequate salute to a man o'war, whereupon the warship fired a shot at her to make her stop and apologize. On this occasion, the gunner went aboard and fined the merchant captain six schillings and six pence for the cost of the powder.
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British Man o'war with other shipping at anchor, by John Thomas Serres (1759–1825) (x)
The matter of wasting powder was raised in the House of Commons. Apparently East Indianmen meeting English warships in the Channel had to salute with 7 guns, while the man o'war replied with 5. At Plymouth Castle each man o'war saluted with 9 guns, the castle replied with the same and then the warship fired 3 more to express its thanks. And so it went on.
An English Captain named Holden, invited to dinner on one of the ships he was escorting to Tangier, was given a 5 gun salute when he left her, to which he replied with 3, apparently on the basis that between Englishmen the vote of thanks required two guns less. But with foreigners the English insisted on having a reply to a salute with the same number of guns. When one Venetian ship saluted an English vessel with 11 guns, she was snubbed with a reply of just 5. On the King's birthday every ship in the fleet - and there were hundreds, large and small - fired 13 guns. When one British admiral entered Malta the Knights of St. Johns gave him a 45 gun salute, lasting two hours. Every English ship then replied with 21.
On the St. George's Day, after the King's health had been drunk, every ship in the fleet fired 25 rounds. And if a ship's captain should die his gunners might fire anything between 40 and 100 rounds. It was an expensive folly which imposed an unnecessary burden on the fragile economy of the Stuart state- but it must have been fun. Unfortunately, this fun was curtailed in the course of the 18th century.
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bybloemencomic · 15 hours
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This week in Bybloemen: Basil and Crumb discuss the limitations of bread as a bribe
Bybloemen
Hiveworks Comics
The best way for webcomics to find an audience is through reader recommendations. So If you like Bybloemen, consider reblogging this update so that the comic can find new readers! 
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riesenfeldcenter · 2 days
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The more I look at this frontispiece (from this 1684 account of the trial of King Charles I), the more the White Lotus Season 2 opening theme song intensifies in my head.
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neapolis-neapolis · 2 days
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Chiesa di Santa Maria di Portosalvo (fine XVI - XVIII secc.), Napoli.
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lindahall · 2 days
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Anthony van Dyck – Scientist of the Day
Anthony van Dyck, a Flemish artist, was born in Antwerp on Mar. 22, 1599.
read more...
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jeannepompadour · 18 hours
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Duchesse de Longueville (1619-1679), circle of François de Troy (1645-1730; mid 17th century
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werewolfetone · 1 day
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Sorry for continuing the sudden uptick in Puritanposting but something else Puritan related that I keep seeing on this godforsaken site is the "oh ho ho they wanted to ban Christmas cos they hated fun, isn't that fucked up? this is why evangelicals are evil" thing, which is misrepresentative in multiple ways. one, the Puritans weren't trying to ban anything that was, like, fun. Christmas in the 17th century was like, you get together with your family, you go to church several times, you get home, eat a big meal, and that's it. rich people would go hunting maybe, or give their servants a small bonus in terms of pay. Christmas trees, presents, etc etc didn't exist. source. and the reason they were trying to ban Christmas is not because they hated fun or thought that it was sinful, but because Christmas being December 25th is just kind of a date that's assigned then for liturgical reasons, it's not the actual date that the historical figure of Jesus (assuming that he existed) was actually probably born on. and one of the core beliefs of Puritanism was the idea that there is no earthly authority on religion in any way, so the Puritans didn't like the idea of an established church holiday that doesn't directly align with a date given in the bible. they also saw Christmas as a Catholic Holiday, (christ - mass) and they despised the Catholics, so they wanted to root it out as Catholic influence. source.
Also, this is less of misinformation and more of a pet peeve, but the various modern Evangelical cults are not modern Puritans. they just aren't. those are largely Baptist or something similar, the Puritans and modern American Evangelicals are not connected and also not really comparable.
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amatesura · 4 months
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armor, 1617
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cy-lindric · 3 months
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Costume update !! I finally got to wear my 17th century outfit at Provins last weekend. I made the doublet with handmade threaded buttons, the linen shirt, the falling band & tassels, and a very rushed cassock that I'll probably fix or re-make when I have more than a couple of days ahead of me, lol. The lace is from tudor tailor and the boots & pants were thrifted.
I one day I'll find a way to make nice pictures of my costume, too, that'd be nice.
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desimonewayland · 4 months
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Hands of Saint Ginés de la Jara (detail), about 1692, Luisa Roldán. Polychromed wood (pine and cedar) with glass eyes
Getty Museum
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die-rosastrasse · 3 months
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Willem van Aelst
Dutch, 1627-1683
Still Life With Flowers, ca. 1656 (details)
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psikonauti · 2 months
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Flemish Verdure Tapestry
17th Century
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artschoolglasses · 5 months
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Ring, French, 17th Century
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design-is-fine · 3 months
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Joachim Tielke, musical instruments, 1688–1703. 1/ 2 Viola da Gamba 3/ Bell cistern 4/ Guitar 5/ Angelique 6/ Viola da gamba, seven strings. Hamburg, Germany. Via MKG
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