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primal-slayer · 26 days
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Mister Terrific: Arrow vs. Superman 2025
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primal-slayer · 2 months
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The Sacrifice for Magneto: Mystique l X-Men: The Last Stand & Storm l X-Men '97
X-Ladies...stop sacrificing yourself for Magneto!
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primal-slayer · 2 months
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X-Men end credits then vs. now (Rogue and Wolverine credits are never seen in 97)
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primal-slayer · 2 months
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Madelyne Pryor: Sinister Redemptions + powers throughout X-Men 97
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primal-slayer · 2 months
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Jubilee + Powers throughout X-Men 97
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primal-slayer · 2 months
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Jean Grey + Powers in X-Men 97
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primal-slayer · 2 months
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Storm + Powers throughout X-Men 97 Season 1
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primal-slayer · 2 months
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Women of Pryde of the X-Men
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primal-slayer · 2 months
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Pryde of the X-Men/X-Men '97 parallels
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primal-slayer · 2 months
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Storm/Ororo Munroe throughout animation
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primal-slayer · 2 months
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Storm: Pryde of the X-men & X-Men 97
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The evolution of Storm - Xmen credits
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primal-slayer · 2 months
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Superman Suit: On the big screen, on the small screen, and the unused
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primal-slayer · 3 months
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Evolution of the MMPR morph
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All of the MMPR morphing in each of the pilot episodes
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primal-slayer · 3 months
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Re-designing Wonder Woman
Various writers/artists talk through redesigning Wonder Woman
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CBR News: Diana's new costume was revealed in "Wonder Woman" #41. In her own words, it was finally time for her to leave the 'girl behind' and embrace then woman that she's become. What can you tell us about the new design and why it represents Diana as a god, a queen and a warrior for justice?
Meredith Finch: One of things Dave and I discussed was that the initial costume that she wore was the one that she put on when she left Themyscira and went into the world of men. At that time, she wasn't part of the Justice League. She was just herself. I wanted the costume to be more in line with what other members of the Justice League are wearing. I also wanted it to be in line with the fact that she is a queen now. If you look at the costume that Hippolyta wore -- traditionally, queens tend to put on much more ceremonial costumes. And, she's also a warrior, so I wanted to be a really strong, solid costume. It hints at the Amazon culture but also fits in the modern world.
When making a major decision, like changing an iconic costume, how much credence lies with fandom and those that have loved the costume since the days of the Linda Carter TV series and the George Perez miniseries and what serves your story and new readers of the title?
If you look at the sketch designs that Dave did (published in "Wonder Woman" #41) for the new costume, first and foremost, they are all intended to be reflective of the character. And when you find something that works, it's like a title for a book: It just works. Dave did quite a few costume designs, and once he did the one that we landed on, it worked instantly for both of us. Getting approval from DC Editorial was fairly easy, because looking at it, the costume just has a synergy with the character. It's strong and reflective of who Diana is, and is still very recognizable as a Wonder Woman costume.
Does the costume have any special properties, or is Diana powerful enough that she does not need any extra protection?
The nice thing is that because it's a new suit, if we decide that we want to add something to it, we'll be able to do that. But looking at who she is right now, she's not just Wonder Woman and an Amazon princess -- she's Wonder Woman and the God of War. As a god, she really is invincible. The suit is much more a reflection of who she is than an addition to who she is. But to be fair, it was designed by Hephaestus, so I am sure there is something special in there because he does love her. https://www.cbr.com/finch-on-signifi...ys-redemption/
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“She’s been locked into pretty much the exact same outfit since her debut in 1941,” Mr. Straczynski wrote. “If you’re going to make a statement about bringing Wonder Woman into the 21st century, you need to be bold and you need to make it visual. I wanted to toughen her up, and give her a modern sensibility.”
He added, “What woman only wears only one outfit for 60-plus years?”
Given Wonder Woman’s pre-eminence as a female character in the largely male superhero pantheon, her looks have always been a matter of more than casual interest, to both fanboys and feminists. In a 2006 interview about her work on the series, the novelist Jodi Picoult said: “One of the first things I did was ask if we could give her breast-reduction surgery, because as a woman, I know you wouldn’t fight crime in a bustier. But I was somehow shot down by DC.” The new costume was designed by the artist Jim Lee, who in February was named co-publisher of DC, alongside Dan DiDio. Given the assignment, “my first reaction was, ‘Oh my gosh,’ ” Mr. Lee said in an interview. But he welcomed the challenge: “When these characters become so branded that you can’t change things, they become ossified.”
The new look — with an understated “W” insignia, a midnight blue jacket and a flinty fusion of black tights and boots — is darker than the famed swimsuit-style outfit, and aims to be contemporary, functional and, as Tim Gunn of “Project Runway” might say, less costumey.
Given the hope that the character will one day have her own international film franchise (a feature has long been gestating at Warner Entertainment, DC’s parent company), one test of the design was to imagine how it would look standing next to, say, Batman’s politically neutral ensemble. “The original costume was the American flag brought to life,” Mr. Lee said. “This one is a little more universal.”
Mr. Lee has drawn his share of sexy superheroines (the X-Men’s Rogue among them), some in skimpy costume, and knows what many fans will ask: “Why am I covering up her legs?” Ultimately, he wanted her to look strong “without screaming, ‘I’m a superhero.’ ”
The arrival of Issue 600 is a bit of comic-book sleight of hand, or, as DC calls it, a return to historical numbering. Wonder Woman’s first self-titled series, which begin in 1942, ended with No. 329. The character was then overhauled, her previous continuity erased, and she starred in Volume 2 as a heroine new to the world. That incarnation lasted 226 issues. Another new direction spurred a third volume (and, to collectors who care about such things, another Issue No. 1) that ran for 44 issues. Do the math, and what would have been Issue No. 45 is now Volume 1, No. 600.
The new costume will almost certainly be better received than the curveball thrown Wonder Woman in 1968, when she lost her powers, dressed mod and practiced martial arts. It took the attention of no less than Gloria Steinem to protest the change, and to help get the Amazon back into her star-spangled duds. Ms. Steinem went on to use Wonder Woman, resplendent in red, white and blue, on the cover of the first issue of Ms. magazine in 1972. A cover line proclaimed, “Wonder Woman for President.”
That’s the kind of attention Mr. Straczynski thinks she deserves: “Wonder Woman is a strong, dynamic, vibrant character who should be selling in the top 20, and I’m going to do all I can to get her there.” http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/30/bo...S8G9WNUsmwNo5Q
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I got to design the Wonder Woman costume for our Earth Two series, with just some small tweaks by Jim Lee. It’s my version of her battle armor as apposed to a classic variant. It was the most appropriate direction considering the context.
Truthfully, I like the middle ground between pure fantasy and practicality. I want to know how a costume works, what all the parts are for, where did it come from, what it’s made of. I want there to be a practical nature but for that to not limit the design. https://sciencefiction.com/2012/03/1...-nicola-scott/
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IGN: I'm glad you brought up the costume. Both you and Nicola are obviously drawing Diana at very different points in her life. Can you talk about the process of redesigning her look and what influences you drew from?
Sharp: Yeah, there's the basic one from the New 52. There's elements of that. There's also elements from the film version. With the one I'm doing, Greg was like, "Do you like the film costume?", and I said I really liked it. So let's just do that. That's settled. I was very happy to adapt that look for what I was doing with the costume. Nic's has slight variations. I talked about this with Greg. She'll wear different outfits. For instance, the cape is ceremonial. It's not always going to be there. We're of the belief that these characters live in a real universe. Obviously it's a fictional universe, but they wouldn't continue to wear the same clothes all the time. It's just ridiculous to assume that they would. So there are variations, and that's fine with me.
Scott: In the Year One story, I had asked if we could take the film costume and make it just a little more comic book-y and a little brighter and shinier. This is her first outing wearing a Wonder Woman costume. It's freshly minted. The breastplate has just come out of the forge and it's just been dyed. It's fresh. It's her first adventure off the island.
Sharp: Whereas mine is all tattered and beaten up and scuffed.
Scott: And probably has pieces replaced. It's a more mature outfit, where mine is meant to make her look a little more optimistic. https://www.ign.com/articles/2016/05...s-diana-prince
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MFT: Did you design the costume? How did you approach the task of a Victorian-era Wonder Woman design?
PW: Yes, I based it on a Victorian/Western showgirl. I looked at the original costume, hence the eagle, but stylized it to give it a more turn-of-the-century feel. I looked at Art Nouveau artists like Alphonse Mucha especially and some of the Pre-Raphealite painters like Holman Hunt, Millais, and the more stylistic Dante Gabriel Rosetti and also Victorian painters Alma Tadema and John William Waterhouse. It was important for me to understand Victorian scruples as much as their idealization of beauty. https://fanbasepress.com/press/featu...oman-amazonia/
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]JF: From my perspective I’m really inspired by the designs that these film-makers are coming up with in these movies. A lot of the times I sit there and I look at these designs and go, “These are great! Why aren’t we thinking about these designs in comics? How come we didn’t think of that first?” I have to say, it’s really cool to see that Ben Affleck’s Batman costume looks like it does in the comics. It’s taking its cue from the comics, you know? So I made a joke on Twitter that I’d been drawing Ben Affleck’s Batman for the last three years. I draw this guy with a giant chin in a Batman suit.
We came up with our Wonder Woman design, and a lot of people would think that our Wonder Woman design is based off of the movie Wonder Woman, but actually it’s based off of an old drawing I did five years ago that Geoff found and really liked. So we used that as a costume. Then it just so happened that, “Oh, Cool! There’s a Wonder Woman costume that kind of goes in that same direction!” I think with the comics, visually, we want these characters to look as classic as possible. The more classic you make your characters look, the longer life your book has. It can transcend time. It’s not stuck in a time period where it’s, “Well, remember when they did that?” It’s these characters are in their classic looks.
We really talked about that because we want this book to be as big as possible. We want it to be as timeless as possible, and we want fans to come to our Justice League to see the characters in their classic designs, and just dive into the story and go from there. We want to deliver the best visual and story book that we possibly can. We want you to feel like you’re getting your money’s worth with these books, every single month. That’s our goal. http://www.multiversitycomics.com/in...war-interview/
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Wonder Woman isn’t wearing her traditional costume but pants. Tell me a bit about how you came up with the look? Which do you prefer? Are these Amazon pants or off the shelf pants?
“You know what Lois like to see when she gets home? Pants. Pants on everyone.” As for these pants, they're store-bought. Or maybe “borrowed.” We’ll get to a more traditional look (or an amalgam of the various “traditional” takes) later in the arc. I had one idea for that one. Jorge took it, and ran with it and gave it his own twist, and it looks GREAT. As for her “vigilante” look when we meet her, we were going for something a little more urban combat-y. Pockets. Knives. Hair up. Some of her Agent Diana Prince look, mixed in with a bit of her (in hindsight, unjustly) lamented “Odyssey" look. Of course, we’d be remiss to not have her bracelets/gauntlets. She can’t NOT have those. Therein lies madness. https://dcwomenkickingass.tumblr.com...der-woman-once
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Themyscira is just the start of Paquette’s visual re-imagining. “My first thought when Wonder Woman with Grant was mentioned was ‘I don’t want her to be dressed as an American flag.’ Not because an American flag is wrong but it made no sense. She’s coming from such a rich, wonderful culture with so much iconography (Greek culture), so why does she not use that, and why would she dress up as a flag? She’s not Captain America. But at the same time, I understood that this kind of iconic colour/texture is something that’s recognizable, so in that aspect it does have value. If I could reach the same design with a few differences, but make it so it’s not coming from the flag, it’s coming from a natural extension of her culture, I could live with this. The retro-engineering of her costume into something that makes sense is already embedded into the story.” He details some of the changes he has in mind. “The animal associated to Aphrodite is a dove so instead of an eagle on [Wonder Woman’s] breastplate, it will be more of a dove. It’s not the American eagle, it’s the Aphrodite dove. Stuff that creates [the letter] W is by accident, so it’s not like she already has a letter of the alphabet on her [costume]. In the end I’ve created a structure so it feels inevitable for Wonder Woman to look the way she does.” https://thatshelf.com/interview-yanick-paquette-on-wonder-woman/
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primal-slayer · 4 months
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New Jean intro as the real? Jean Grey returns?
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primal-slayer · 4 months
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Dark Phoenix then vs. now
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X-Men Dark Phoenix X-men '92 vs X-Men '97
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